Program Participant

Program Participant

Nir Kshetri

Research Fellow, Research Institute for Economics & Business Administration, Kobe University, and Professor, Bryan School of Business and Economics, The University of North Carolina-Greensboro
USA

Nir Kshetri is Professor at Bryan School of Business and Economics, The University of North Carolina-Greensboro, and a research fellow at Research Institute for Economics & Business Administration - Kobe University, Japan. Nir is the author of four books. His 2014 book Global Entrepreneurship: Environment and Strategy (Routledge: New York) was selected as an Outstanding Academic Title by Choice Magazine (January 2015 Issue). Nir has also published eighty six journal articles.

Nir participated as lead discussant at the Peer Review meeting of the UNCTAD’s Information Economy Report 2013 and Information Economy Report 2015. He is a two time winner of the Pacific Telecommunication Council’s Meheroo Jussawalla Research Paper Prize (2010 and 2008). Nir has been interviewed and/or quoted in over 60 TV channels, magazines and newspapers. The Russian language publication, computerra.ru has described him as one of the world’s leading experts in cybercrime.

You can find Nir Kshetri in:

Research Workshop: Privacy and Security
Sunday, 15 January 2017
13.30–15.00

Research Topical Session 8: Network Infrastructure, Architectures and Technologies
Tuesday, 17 January 2017
15.30–16.45

Proceedings:

Business Opportunities and Barriers for Big Data in Vietnam

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Slides

Abstract

Vietnam is considered to be an emerging market with a number of high profile examples of big data (BD) application in several sectors such as healthcare, banking, marketing, logistics, and agriculture. According the KPMG (2015), 97% of business leaders in Vietnam were ready to apply BD.

In the agricultural sector, Vingroup, which is Vietnam’s biggest privately owned company, uses BD and other agricultural technologies from Israel, Japan and the Netherland in its agricultural projects. Vietnam’s FPT Telecom and Japan’s Fujitsu have reached into an agreement to deploy Fujitsu’s Akisai cloud technology to support agricultural management. Drip irrigation systems are being deployed. Trung Nguyen Corporation, which is Vietnam’s biggest domestically-owned roasting and instant coffee business, has installed Israeli drip irrigation systems. Another high-profile example is TH Milk facility, which teamed up with a group of Israeli companies led by the milking technology developer Afimilk to construct a milk facility in central Vietnam, which consists of 8,100 hectares. On the environmental front, one example of a city using the Internet of Things (IoT) to address congestion problem in transportation networks is Vietnam’s Da Nang, which is a major port city on the South China Sea coast next to Han River.

Among major challenges is BD skill deficits. Vietnamese universities’ inability to train the next generation of highly-skilled workers has been a roadblock in the development of BD-related workforce.

In light of the above observations, this session aims to analyze the current situation, trends as well as business opportunities and barriers for BD deployment in key economic sectors in Vietnam

Escaping the Cyber-insecurity Trap

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Slides

Abstract

Organizations are bombarded by a multitude of threats and pressures from a variety of sources that require them to strengthen cybersecurity (CS).  In addition to threats from cybercriminals, organizations also face pressures from regulators, business partners and other sources to strengthen CS. Despite these threats and pressures, most organizations lack an appropriate CS investment strategy. A 2014 global survey of PricewaterhouseCoopers indicated that only 38% of organizations had a methodology to prioritize CS investments based on risk and impacts on business strategy. According to a 2011 survey sponsored by Symantec and the National Cyber Security Alliance and conducted by Zogby International, 77% of U.S. small businesses lacked formal written CS policy for employees and 49% lacked even an informal policy.

In light of the above observations, the presentation will discuss how organizations may fall into the various traps that can contribute to their failure to take appropriate CS measures. It also delves into mechanisms that can help them escape the traps of cyber-insecurity. With illustrations of many real world examples, the presentation documents best practices, as well as the pitfalls that are to be avoided in order to strengthen CS. It combines theories, concepts, ideas and findings from a number of disciplines such as neurochemistry, computer science, psychology, criminology, law and international relations to analyze CS. The presentation proposes a holistic approach that takes into account organizational functions and activities that are likely to be affected as well as the roles and responsibility of all organizational actors in strengthening CS. It will also have major pointers towards refining and evaluating various performance measurement criteria and metric in order to strengthen CS.

 

The Political Economy of the Development and Deployment of the Internet of Things in the Developing World

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Slides

Abstract

The objectives of this presentation are to (a) give an overview of how the IoT is currently being used in the developing world; and b) take a look at the opportunities and challenges that IoT initiatives present to organizations in the developing world. Specifically, we will consider how the IoT can address some of the institutional bottlenecks, the lack of human and physical capital, technological challenges and key sources of high transaction costs, which have been identified as the main causes of underdevelopment.

A special focus is on the potential roles of the IoT in reducing transaction costs. The presentation argues that the IoT can make up for the lack of institutional problems associated with high transaction costs. Advancements in the IoT make measurement of whatever one wants to measure easy, accurate and cost effective.  For instance, in environmental monitoring and protection, sensors can measure a wide range of environmental parameters, such as pollution, noise, relative humidity, wind speed and direction, and air temperature. In agriculture, the sensors can help measure soil and vegetation characteristics.

Enforcements can be implemented at three levels: first-party, second-party, and third-party. Third-party enforcement mechanisms, which are often formal coercive enforcement measures by the state, have been relatively ineffective. This increases the relative importance of the first two types of enforcement. The IoT can make first-party enforcement or self-enforcement attractive and help individuals and enterprises live up to contracts and promises. In a second-party enforcement, one party retaliates against the other. The IoT provides a low-cost mechanism for this type of enforcement.

 

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